Seminar Friday, March 23, 2018

Speaker:
C. Edward Dixon, PhD
Neurotrauma Professor of Neurological Surgery
Vice Chair of Research, Department of Neurological Surgery
University of Pittsburgh
Health Research Scientist
VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMD

Title:
Mechanisms of Neurotransmission Deficits After Traumatic Brain Injury

Bioskech:
Dr. Dixon is a Professor, Vice Chair for Research, and Endowed Chair for Neurotrauma in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. He has secondary appointments in the Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Critical Care Medicine, and Neurobiology. He is also Research Health Scientist at the Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center in the Veteran’s Affairs Pittsburgh Health Care System.  Dr. Dixon received his Ph.D. degree in Physiological Psychology from the Virginia Commonwealth University and was awarded a National Research Service Award for Postdoctoral Fellows by the NIH in 1985 joined the Division of Neurological Surgery at the Medical College of Virginia. In 1986, he became a postdoctoral fellow in the CNS Injury Group in the Biomedical Science Department of the General Motors Technical Center. Dr. Dixon was named Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurosurgery at the Medical College of Virginia in 1987. He was awarded the Young Investigator Award from the National Head Injury Foundation in 1990.  He became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston in 1991. In 1995, he joined the Brain Trauma Research Center in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh and became its Director in 2004.  Dr. Dixon is a charter member, Past-President (2002-2003) of the National Neurotrauma Society.  Dr. Dixon serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Neurotrauma, Neural Regeneration Research, Frontiers in Neurotrauma, and Metabolic Brain Disease.  Dr. Dixon founded and directed the website for the National Neurotrauma Society (www.neurotrauma.org) from 1997-2012.  He has served as regular member on the NIH Brain Injury and Neurovascular Pathologies study section, as well as a regular grant reviewer for other private, state, and federal agencies, including the VA.  He has been the recipient of several federal grants including program projects, RO1s, and Merit Awards. Dr. Dixon has contributed significantly to the evolution of animal models of traumatic brain injury, including the development and characterization of the first rat fluid-percussion and control cortical impact models of traumatic brain injury.  Dr. Dixon has a long interest in mechanisms of posttraumatic functional deficits and has published extensively on neurochemical mechanisms and chronic therapies for posttraumatic cognitive deficits.